21
Aug

ALN Bridges: Avinash Govindjee

In this edition of ALN Bridges, Hema Vallabh, Co-Founder of Women in Engineering, interviews incoming Member, Avinash Govindjee.

What does the “next step” look like for a young African leader like Avinash Govindjee? Obtaining his doctorate in law at the age of 27, Avinash was granted full professorship at the age of 34. He was listed as one of the Mail & Guardian’s Top 200 Young South Africans to watch, the Nelson Mandela Bay Business Chamber’s Top 40 under 40, and was a finalist in the Titans Building Nations Award for achievement in academia.

Avinash is now the Head of the Department of Public Law and Deputy Head of the Labour and Social Security Law Unit at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. He is an Attorney of the High Court of South Africa, a Senior Commissioner at the South African Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration and a consultant to the International Institute for Social Law and Policy (IISLP). He is also widely published in South Africa and abroad on themes related to human rights.

For Avinash Govindjee, a passion for development in the Africa has engendered his specific focus on law and policy designed to assist governments on the continent, particularly in the area of human rights. Having already been involved in a range of labour and social security related projects for various government departments and agencies in SADC, most recently the introduction of return to work arrangements in South Africa and Namibia, Avinash plans to focus his research for the remainder of the year on the labour and social security rights of Mozambican mineworkers.

Avinash believes that a fresh approach to leadership on the continent is necessary, motivating him to join the African Leadership Network (ALN). He is excited at the prospect of sharing ideas with other young African leaders at the Annual Gathering in Morocco, and looks forward to the engagement and collaboration that is likely to ensue. Passionate about addressing the triple challenge of poverty, inequality and unemployment, Avinash is firmly of the view that a new generation of African leaders, adopting context-specific approaches to development, will be able to contribute to the prosperity of society.

(photo credit: www.saspen.org)